‘DEMI’ album review

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(Photo: Album cover ‘DEMI’ by Demi Lovato.)

DEMI‘ is the fourth studio album from Disney phenomenon, Demi Lovato, following billboard topping previous albums ‘Don’t Forget‘, ‘Here We Go Again‘ and ‘Unbroken‘. Lovato hit the mainstream after appearing in the Disney Channel original movie ‘Camp Rock‘ alongside The Jonas Brothers, but has since set her sights on more of the music world.

Due to her work as one of the four judges on the infamous X-Factor that opened avenues for her fourth album to be taken a lot more seriously than her previous three, as she has now completely shed her Disney Channel Star status and moved up as a respected musician in her own right.

The album, released May 2013 by Hollywood Records, tells the story of Lovato’s recent struggles with addiction which were spread all over the world via scandal sites and the internet from 2008 until 2010 when she checked herself into a rehab facility to address concerns with drug use, eating disorders and self harm.

The tracklisting on this album goes from number 1 dance tracks like ‘Heart Attack‘, ‘Made in the USA‘ and even her tour titled ‘Neon Lights‘, to the more melancholic tracks like ‘Warrior‘ and ‘Nightingale‘ which take a more obvious attempt at confronting the struggles that relate to the album.

Songs like ‘Warrior’ became an instant overnight success with fans of Lovato after the album release due to it possibly being the most raw and heartfelt song she has ever written, the deeper songs seemed to latch on to the heart strings of the fans quicker than her more popular, more expected dance track renditions. 

‘DEMI’ debuted at number 3 on the American Billboards with 110,000 copies sold within the first week of it’s release, becoming her best selling debut week of her entire career. 

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The Beatles ‘White Album’, a look back over music history

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(Photo: The Bealtes)

John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. These four men have imprinted the world of music we now live in intensely, and their legacy will continue to live on forever. When The Beatles hit the world, everything changed. Many people have their own opinions on their music and most don’t agree on what is their best, although my favourite has always been The Beatles self-titled album, popularly referred to as The White Album.

The White Album is the ninth official album by the English group; it is a double record, which was released back in 1968. The graphics on the cover of the album are less than minimal, it remains a plain white background with the bands name embossed, and also on the very early LP, there appeared to be a serial number on the white sleeve.

Upon the albums release in November 1968, the album skyrocketed. It reached number one on the charts in the United Kingdom and in the United States. The album is recognised for it’s incredibly electric sound, some refer to this album using the famous quote being that “The Beatles finally went electric”, this has left music critics constantly divided in evaluating its legacy. The album has sold more that 30 million copies worldwide and was listed as number 10 on Rolling Stone’s “500 Greatest Albums of All Time” list, and Rolling Stone also ranked it number 9 on “The 100 Best Albums of the Last Twenty Years” list back in 1987.

As it was The Beatles’ first studio album to of been made in eighteen months and to be the album coming after the phenomenal success of ‘Sgt Pepper’s..’, expectations were exceptionally high for The White Album. The album debuted at number one in the UK on December 1st 1968, becoming their third album to do so, following ‘Help!’ and ‘Revolver’. In all, The Beatles spent 155 weeks on the Billboard 200.

I believe this to be the greatest album from The Beatles ever; I think this was when they hit their peak of the sound they wanted. Each track is completely different, which compliments the next. Some critics have said “the mess made on this album is what makes it so great.”

The Influence of Women in Rock Music

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(Photo: Joan Jett & Cherrie Cure of The Runaways.)

Women in rock music, the never-ending ‘gender v genre’ debate. Over the years there have been many iconic females who have left their mark on the rock world, Courtney Love in the hard-rock band HoleJoan Jett and The BlackheartsCherrie Currie forcing The Runaways into instant stardom. Even so, the constant battle of whether a woman belongs in rock is on-going, is it really just a man’s place?

An ongoing argument, and rage amongst most feminists, is that a female is only appreciated in rock for the sex appeal; certain women have unknowingly supported this theory in their infamous actions both on, and off the stage. Courtney Love had a trademark move where she would apply an ‘x’ made from tape on to her breasts, then flash them at the crowd, obviously using her sex appeal to her advantage. Whereas, there have been the odd few women who have made as big an impact as a male in rock without the added obvious sex appeal effect. Gaye Advert from The Adverts is a huge example of this, Advert was named the “first female punk star” by ‘The Virgin Encyclopedia of 70s Music’.

Throughout many arguments through the history of females in rock, as to whether they deserve to have a spot there, despite it there are many iconic women whose standing influence on the genre can’t be doubted, they have completely impacted and changed the face of rock music, just as much as males have influenced it.

Rock music is still very much seen as a man’s world by many of it’s listeners around the world, it doesn’t change the fact that there are many women who have made massive impacts on the world surrounding rock.

The Influence of Women in Rock Music

Image

(Photo: Joan Jett & Cherrie Cure of The Runaways.)

Women in rock music, the never-ending ‘gender v genre’ debate. Over the years there have been many iconic females who have left their mark on the rock world, Courtney Love in the hard-rock band Hole; Joan Jett and The Blackhearts, Cherrie Currie forcing The Runaways into instant stardom. Even more recent women in rock have already started to imprint the scene, from Gwen Stefani to Hayley Williams. Even so, the constant battle of whether a woman belongs in rock is on-going, is it really just a man’s place?

A constant argument, and rage amongst most feminists, is that a female is only appreciated in rock for the sex appeal; certain women have unknowingly supported this theory in their infamous actions both on, and off the stage. Courtney Love had a trademark move where she would apply an ‘x’ made from tape on to her breasts, then flash them at the crowd, obviously using her sex appeal to her advantage. Whereas, there have been the odd few women who have made as big an impact as a male in rock without the added obvious sex appeal effect. Gaye Advert from The Adverts is a huge example of this, Advert was named the “first female punk star” by ‘The Virgin Encyclopedia of 70s Music’ and has, on multiple occasions, been referred to as “one of Punk’s first female icons”. Advert is still very much idolized by many females in rock music today.

Nowadays, being an established female in a band is a difficult thing to accomplish. It’s the constant battle of trying to keep up the appearance of being a band, not simply a female and a backup band, this is the main problem within bands that are full male, with the exception of a female vocalist. I speak from personal experience in saying establishing a female fronted rock band is also difficult in the fact that, each rock band nowadays fronted by a woman, all genre’s aside, are simply compared from the get go.

Furthermore, there is the growing interest over male influence on women in rock. Kurt Cobain, late front-man of Seattle based Grunge-rock band Nirvana, whose 90s influence still heavily remains in vast amounts of todays rock bands, Cobain was married to Courtney Love from Hole and it is believed Hole only reached fame due to that relationship. The argument of women being the main case behind a band breaking down is another huge downfall for women in rock music, Nancy Spungen being a prime example of this, despite not being an artist herself, she is infamous for being the major downfall of British punk-band Sex Pistols. Another example being Yoko Ono, who is blamed for the breakdown of The Beatles, this doesn’t bode well for actual female rock artists, it gives them the appearance of being a stereotypical “diva”.

Throughout many arguments through the history of females in rock, as to whether they deserve to have a spot there, despite it there are many iconic women whose standing influence on the genre can’t be doubted, they have completely impacted and changed the face of rock music, just as much as males have influenced it.

Rock music is still very much seen as a man’s world by many of it’s listeners around the world, it doesn’t change the fact that there are many women who have made massive impacts on the world surrounding rock.